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A sneak peek at new action adventure Dinosaurs in the Wild

Creators behind Dinosaurs in the Wild give educators a sneak preview of new immersive educational experience

Posted by Hannah Vickers | April 02, 2017 | Events

The creators behind new immersive live-action adventure Dinosaurs in the Wild have given educators a sneak preview of the extraordinary sets and special effects that will officially open to the public in June.

With Dinosaurs in the Wild, teachers will be able to take school groups of 7-11 year olds somewhere they’ve never been before – 67 million years back in time, to the late Cretaceous period. Specially designed to ignite pupils’ imaginations, it will put school groups face-to-face with living dinosaurs and bring science to life before their eyes.

Using cutting-edge effects, the 70-minute adventure allows pupils to ask questions as they explore their surroundings, including laboratories in which they’ll see a hatchery, young dinosaurs and an autopsy. The experience culminates with a 360-degree view of them their natural environment.

While experiencing a guided tour of the set as it goes through the final phases of development, Danny Nicholson, experienced teacher-trainer and interactive whiteboard specialist, said:

“The level of detail and thought that has gone into the development of Dinosaurs in the Wild is impressive. Seeing a ‘real’ dinosaur, how it moves and feels, will be an incredible experience for any young person. Having all the senses stimulated by the sights and sounds of the interactive exhibits will create an excellent environment for experiential learning. It will be something that pupils are really going to remember, and teachers can follow up on that experience when they’re back in the classroom.”

With Dinosaurs in the Wild, we wanted to create an immersive experience that takes visitors back in time, using the latest in technology to portray the incredible detailing of the creatures and their surroundings. It will truly change people’s understanding of how dinosaurs looked - Tim Haines, Creative Director of Dinosaurs in the Wild

The Creative Director of Dinosaurs in the Wild, Tim Haines, was the award-winning producer of the BBC TV series Walking with Dinosaurs, seen by 800 million globally.  “With Dinosaurs in the Wild, we wanted to create an immersive experience that takes visitors back in time, using the latest in technology to portray the incredible detailing of the creatures and their surroundings. It will truly change people’s understanding of how dinosaurs looked,” he said.

Supported by more than 100 specialists, led by palaeontologist Dr Darren Naish and including artists, technicians and other industry specialists, the production team has ensured that every detail within the experience is in line with the latest scientific research on how dinosaurs looked and behaved.

What can you expect?

  • An array of more than two thousand vials and jars of things like dinosaur tissue samples, eyeballs, brains, teeth and claws of the creatures that lived at that time
  • A huge Alamosaurus heart in a glass cylinder, so visitors can see how much energy it took to drive blood up the five-metre long neck of the giraffe-like giant
  • Piles of dinosaur poo so pupils can discover the difference between carnivore and herbivore droppings, before examining prehistoric parasites and dinosaur skin under the microscope
  • Virtual reality, for pupils to see through a dinosaur’s eyes
  • Scientists conducting a ‘live autopsy’ on a five-metre long crested Pachycephalosaurus. The animal is suspended across an operating table lit by surgical lights, so that visitors will be able to make out details, such as the cross-section of its large skull
  • A specimen of the very first human ancestor – a tiny squirrel-like creature called Purgatorius, which lived in trees in the Late Cretaceous
  • The Hatchery, in which three incubators hold different species of dinosaur eggs. As well as discovering a host of information about the variety of egg shapes, growth stages and the laying patterns of these prehistoric animals, visitors will see baby Triceratops squirming inside their shells, eggs communicating with each other and some deceptively cute Dakotaraptor hatchlings

To support teachers before and after this unique experience, Dinosaurs in the Wild will also provide new curriculum-linked resources for English and Science lessons. All school bookings will receive a password that enables access to the full resource set. Teachers can access a free preview here.

Dinosaurs in the Wild premiers at the NEC in Birmingham in June this year, before moving to Manchester’s EventCity in October 2017.

All educational group bookings enjoy a special ticket price of £12 per pupil, as well as free tickets for accompanying teacher (one per five pupils in primary; and one per 10 pupils in secondary). Contact our call centre to book tickets now or reserve your school’s space for up to four weeks.

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