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SURFACING SPECIAL: Charles Lawrence

We speak to surfacing experts Charles Lawrence about what to consider when installing a new sports surface

Posted by Hannah Oakman | October 19, 2016 | Sports & Leisure

Tell us about the service you offer to schools.

Charles Lawrence Surfaces can provide schools with top quality design input from full project design and build, to contributing to any client design team as required. 

We carry out full turnkey packages taking the scheme from a green field site to the completed facility.  Given the specialist nature of the work we are often required to assist with or obtain planning approval and accreditation by sports governing authorities.

What are the differences between surfacing options? 

3G Synthetic turf – Long pile sand/rubber synthetic filled synthetic turf is suitable for football & rugby. The pile is supported by a thin stabilising of sand, and by an infill of rubber crumb. The pile height ranges from 40mm to 65mm depending on which primary sport is to be played on the surface. The synthetic turf can be laid onto various bases from the stone base with or without a shockpad to the highest specification of stone base, tarmac and shockpad. 

Sand Dressed – Monfilament yarn, sand infill suitable for hockey. They offer the appearance and playing characteristics of an unfilled surface at a price only a little above that of a sand-filled surface. In particular, unlike the unfilled surfaces, a sand-dressed surface does not require an expensive fixed watering system, which reduces both the capital cost and the running cost.

Sand Filled - Sand-filled synthetic grass laid on a porous rubber shockpad has become the surface of choice for many school, university, club and community hockey pitches because of its economic initial price, its consistent playing characteristics, its weather-resistance, its low maintenance needs compared to natural turf, and its ability to withstand many hours of continuous play. Sand-filled surfaces are approved by the governing body.

What would be your top tips for schools planning new sports facilities?

Think about what sports you want to play on the new facilities, which sport takes priority, are the facilities to be used as a revenue stream? If so, are there other similar facilities within the area that could effect the financial benefits? How will you maintain the facility to maximise the life expectancy?

What’s next for Charles Lawrence?

We are continuously working with the leading suppliers and leading manufacturers to ensure we are at the forefront of the industry in innovation and construction methods. We aim to maintain our position within the market.

Find out more at www.charleslawrencesurfaces.co.uk 

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