Space travel should be STEAM-powered

ACS International Schools says that, if space travel is to continue, it is vital that schoolchildren are students of the STEAM approach to learning

To ensure the longevity of space travel, says ACS International Schools, it is vital that schoolchildren are students of the STEAM approach to learning (science, technology, engineering, maths, plus the arts).

Only then, it argues, can students develop the complete set of complex problem-solving skills and ability to take risks that could see them landing on the Moon.

A recent survey commissioned by ACS found that:

  • Three-quarters of all nine to 11-year-olds believed that they would travel into space
  • Only three percent of the same age group never looked at the night sky
  • Almost half (45%) believed that there is life on Mars
  • One in five knew how far away the Moon is (239,000 miles)
One in five of the schoolchildren surveyed knew the Moon is 239,000 miles away

“In research and development, creativity is a useful tool for thinking of unique solutions to difficult problems,” said Gwen Musial, an ACS alumna and PhD candidate in biomedical engineering at the University of Houston.


From the archive: Babington pupils meet UK astronaut, Tim Peake