Wellbeing award helps more than a thousand schools improve mental health

The Wellbeing Award for Schools has improved student behaviour in 95% of cases, a survey of participants found

The Wellbeing Award for Schools has improved staff and student mental health, a survey of participants has found.

Launched in conjunction with the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) two years ago, the award delivered by Optimus Education has improved staff wellbeing in 93% of participating schools.

The whole-school awards are given to institutions that improve their culture, staff training and wellbeing of students.

More than 1,000 schools have completed or are working towards the award.

It’s a privilege to have these insights into the achievements of the schools that have gone through the challenging process of the Award

In 95% of schools, the award has reduced stigma around mental health and improved pupil behaviour in some capacity.


Read more: Significant increase in school support to parents on mental health


Rachel Grant, director of awards and training at Optimus Education, said: “It’s clear from this report that the Wellbeing Award for Schools is having a significant positive impact on the wellbeing of pupils, staff and parents. A huge thank you to all the schools which took part in this research: their creativity, enthusiasm and willingness to share ideas and practice are truly inspirational.”

NCB’s assistant director, Philippa Stobbs, said: “It’s a privilege to have these insights into the achievements of the schools that have gone through the challenging process of the Award, and to hear them speak so eloquently about the benefits it has brought to their whole-school community.”

Woodhouse Grove School in Apperley Bridge was the first independent school to be awarded the Wellbeing Award for Schools.