White paper explores resilience of international schools in crises

It looks at how international schools have responded to economic and social crises in the past, and market challenges to come due to Covid-19

In light of Covid-19, ISC Research has published a white paper exploring how international schools have responded to economic and social crises in the past, as well as the market challenges that will be faced as a result of the current pandemic.

It addresses the global, regional and country crises such as the 2008 global financial crash, the 2014 oil and gas crisis, and Japan’s earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster in 2011.

In a statement, ISC Research said: “The international schools market is not new to crises and many international schools have comprehensive plans in place for unexpected closures, but nothing has impacted the whole sector quite like Covid-19.

“The international schools market is, nevertheless, expected to show resilience for the same reason it has in the past.

The international schools market is not new to crises and many international schools have comprehensive plans in place for unexpected closures, but nothing has impacted the whole sector quite like Covid-19

“Local international school parents, particularly in Asia, value their child’s education over many other needs. So much so, that they will only withdraw their child from their international school as a last resort.

“During the global recession following the financial crash of 2008, most local children maintained their international school places even if their families were financially impacted in other aspects of their lives.”

The white paper states that many schools are demonstrating adaptability and resilience through their solutions for distance learning, wellbeing provision, and strategies to assess and address learning gaps.

These qualities will need to be maintained to prepare for potential staff recruitment challenges, which ISC said would be fully revealed from July when many teachers need to relocate to take up new positions.

ISC also said there could be a fall in the supply of international teachers worldwide, or travel issues related to border restrictions, meaning international schools will need to consider alternative options.


Read the white paper: www.iscresearch.com/whitepapers

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